yvetteishere

bookriot:

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle Grade lists)

Read More

What GREAT lists of diverse reads for anyone, period.

Children’s and YA books are about being brave and kind, about learning wisdom and love, about that journey into and through maturity that we all keep starting, and starting again, no matter how old we get. I think that’s why so many adults read YA: we’re never done coming of age.
Betsy Cornwell, interview in Uncommon YA (via betsycornwell)
lbardugo:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo, try Drift by M.K Hutchins because both are high fantasy tales full of intrigue, strong world-building, and action.


Can’t wait to check out Drift!

lbardugo:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo, try Drift by M.K Hutchins because both are high fantasy tales full of intrigue, strong world-building, and action.

Can’t wait to check out Drift!

aimso:

Apparently how people feel after waking up from naps.

image

How I feel after waking up from naps.

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Lol. Me too!

sjmaas:

chocolatehazelnutcake:

LOOK AT THEM ALL!
I would have put TAB in but my internet is terrible up here so I couldn’t be bothered.

Ahhh! So cool. <3

Love!

maggie-stiefvater:

Happy St. Mark’s Eve! Behold the official cover and title of Raven Boys III, which comes out October 28, 2014. 

Love this so much!!!

maggie-stiefvater:

Happy St. Mark’s Eve! Behold the official cover and title of Raven Boys III, which comes out October 28, 2014.

Love this so much!!!

How do you typically get over writers block/ avoid getting stuck? And do you have any tips for avoiding pointless parts that add nothing to the story?

maggie-stiefvater:

Rightly or wrongly, I assume my subconscious knows the story that I’m trying to tell, so I generally further assume that writer’s block means that I’ve wandered away from that story.

So my solution for writer’s block is to open a new document, name it OUTTAKES. Then I look at my original manuscript and highlight every single bit of novel that I am not thrilled by. Then I cut it and paste it into outtakes, so I can pretend I’ll use it again.

I guess maybe sometimes I use it again.

I had 150,000 words of outtakes for Dream Thieves. It was a novel I really, really wanted to get right.

I don't know what to do with this power of public response. Supposedly the Lynch brothers play instruments? What do they play/will we get to find out/are you going to just Writer Laugh at this question?

maggie-stiefvater:

Ronan plays the Irish pipes — that might be canon, actually. Is that already in Dream Thieves? It might be. He plays them because they are awesome, difficult, and sad.

GET IT?

One of the Lynch brothers plays the concertina. It’s the cute brother.

If you use magic in fiction, the first thing you have to do is put barriers up. There must be limits to magic. If you can snap your fingers and make anything happen, where’s the fun in that? … The story really starts when you put limits on magic. Where fantasy gets a bad name is when anything can happen because a wizard snaps his fingers. Magic has to come with a cost, probably a much bigger cost than when things are done by what is usually called ‘the hard way.’
Terry Pratchett, author of the Discworld series, on writing magic. (via theticklishpear)
scholasticreadingclub:

I think we can handle this assessment…
(via mashable’s list of “14 Tech Supplies That Made School Tolerable in the ’90s”)

Ah, the memories&#8230;

scholasticreadingclub:

I think we can handle this assessment…

(via mashable’s list of “14 Tech Supplies That Made School Tolerable in the ’90s”)

Ah, the memories…